Potential Modification to Resident Work Hours–What You Need to Know


(“Limits,” Photos before and after a 24 hr shift by Leticia Ruiz-Rivera, used with permission)

Sign our petition against removing the work hour safety limits here!

Medical Student “Dreamers” Speak Out on Maintaining DACA Protections

Debate Simmers of Medical Resident Work Hours

Read our press releases about this issue:

November 7, 2016 Press Release

December 20, 2016 Press Release

**BREAKING** ACGME RELEASES THEIR PROPOSALS TO REMOVE THE SAFETY RESTRICITONS.
THEIR COMMENT PERIOD LASTS FOR 45 DAYS FROM THE ANNOUNCEMENT. COMMENT HERE.

AMSA’s mission is built upon our members’ commitment to advocate for high quality health care, excellence in physician training, and the protection and promotion of the welfare of physicians-in-training and our patients.  We have always advocated for high quality research that protects human subjects and produces high quality data. Such research is critical to advance the practice of medicine, public health, and medical education.

To fulfill this commitment, AMSA has historically engaged with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) to advocate for program requirements and recommendations that reflect these core principles.

Recently several events have prompted AMSA to act upon these principles.  Many of our members have heard about them from friends, attending physicians, and residents. This resource page is intended to assist members as they navigate through the issues regarding learning and work hours for residents, ethical research, and specific studies that are currently ongoing throughout the country.

Currently, the ACGME is in the process of reviewing the Common Program Requirements for Resident Duty Hours in the Learning and Working Environments (section VI) and will put forth recommendations to make changes for the upcoming training year, beginning July 1, 2016. On March 16 and 17 key stakeholders in this process, including AMSA, met to deliver testimony regarding resident work hours. Our positions on these issues can be found in our PPP and in the resources on this page.

AMSA’s Position Paper on Resident Duty Hour Requirements to the ACGME (2/1/16)

Letter from ACGME Chief Executive Officer Dr. Thomas J. Nasca (1/7/16)

Read AMSA’s comments to the ACGME concerning Section VI of the Commom Program Requirements, The Learning and Working Environment during the recent 45-day open comment period, which closed December 19, 2016.

View the Public Citizen December 2016 press release and read their comments about the ACGME Task Force Proposal to Revise Duty-Hour Requirements.

 

Impact of the FiRST and iCompare Trials

This process is especially charged at the current moment due to the recent release of results from a contested trial, the FiRST Trial, as well as the on-going iCompare trial, and the expectation that the results of the trial may play a key role in the review process. Because these trials violate significant ethical principles in human subjects research, AMSA has taken action. It is important to note that although it is no coincidence that these trials relate to duty hours and are occurring during the debate around making changes, AMSA’s objections are about the significant violations of ethical principles and sound research practice.  Many of these actions have been taken in partnership with Public Citizen and all are based on our principles regarding research and ethics, which can be found in our PPP. Several resources are linked here for more information.

Public Citizen’s FiRST and iCompare Trials Page

Links to AMSA and Public Citizen Response to Trials–Letters to OHRP, ACGME:

November, 2015

March, 2016

Text of Follow-up Letter to Karen De Salvo, Acting Assistant Secretary for Health and Jerry Menikoff, M.D., J.D. Director Office for Human Research Protections

Piece addressing the ethics of the trials:“The Backstory–When is consent needed?”

Bioethics Forum: A FIRST-rate Oversight, and Other Problems with Studies of Medical Residents’ Work Hours

HHS FAQs about Human Research Regulations