AMSA On Call
Go Back
  • What Kind of Physician Will You Be? How Variation in Health Care Impacts Your Training

    By Anita Arora, MD Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth’s Class of 2012, and Alicia True, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth’s Class of 2015

    When fourth-year medical students choose which residency programs to rank highly in the Residency Match, various factors play an important role: a hospital’s reputation, the training curriculum, and the student’s own geographical and lifestyle preferences. But there’s something else America’s next wave of doctors should consider: the differences in care provided by even the most elite teaching hospitals, and how these differences affect the way we will practice medicine.

    During residency training, we learn by observing faculty who make decisions regarding how to treat chronically ill patients or whether to recommend elective surgeries. A new report from the Dartmouth Atlas Project, which examined the care provided by 23 top academic medical centers, found considerable variation in both the intensity of care provided to chronically ill patients at the end of life as well as the frequency with which patients undergo surgery when other treatment options are available. It also showed that quality, safety, and patient experience ratings did not increase with increased intensity of care. These variations in the way care is delivered are not ...

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • Patient Safety & Quality Symposium

    In the 1980’s, the Harvard Medical Practice Study found that 4% of hospitalized patients were injured and that two-thirds of those injuries were preventable. In 1999, the Institute of Medicine issued a report, To Err Is Human, which found that there were between 44,000 and 98,000 preventable deaths in the U.S. each year. Since these findings, health care has gone through major changes.

    With these changes, patient safety problems have become increasingly evident. According to the white paper, Unmet Needs, published by the Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation, medical education and training institutions have found themselves struggling to keep up with the need to assure that student physicians are properly equipped with the skills, attitudes, knowledge and behaviors (i.e., patient safety competencies) that will make them capable of becoming part of the patient safety solution.

    The Patient Safety and Quality Symposium offered by the American Medical Student Association, in partnership with the National Patient Safety Foundation with funding support through AHRQ, and being held September 7-8 at Jefferson School of Population Health, will address the critical steps needed to successfully position students and the institutions they attend to function safely and effectively in health care ...

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • Personal Reflection: Research Elective

    Sajeet Sohi, M.D.

    This past fall I had the opportunity as a visiting fourth year medical student to complete a research elective in Pediatric Hematology within Johns Hopkins Medicine. I have been inspired by the dedication the residents, fellows, and attending physicians show towards patient care and advancing medical knowledge. Being exposed to the research process and clinical excellence offer a physician-in-training like myself a goal of what the ideal medical practitioner would be.

    I still remember my first day on the campus walking to the Registrar’s Office and awaiting my placement. I was impressed by the size of the campus and I tried to absorb the history I was surrounded with. Clinical clerks from medical schools in the U.S. and around the world participate in the program and I would recommend an elective in a large academic center to my fellow clinical clerks. I look forward to further clinical research opportunities in the future.

    It was a terrific learning experience and I gained a new appreciation for academic medicine. I will always remember my experiences as I progress through my career. As I reviewed the records of the patients; especially since it was a pediatric population I have realized the ...

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • I'm back!

    Andrea Knittel
    AMSA Member
    7th Year MSTP/M3
    University of Michigan

    Post #8 of the  "Back to the Wards" series focusing on the transition from research years back to the medical school and clinical rotations.

    Yesterday marked the start of my outpatient pediatrics rotation, the first of my third year of medical school, and the end of this series of posts on my transition from doctoral work in the School of Public Health to my third year clerkships. As I interacted with my M3 colleagues during general orientation last week, and pediatrics orientation yesterday morning, I was struck by the overall high level of anxiety. In spite of my perception that everyone (except maybe the other returning MD/PhD students) should be calmer than me because of their more recent completion of things like clinical competency assessments and Step 1 of the USMLE, all of us were talking nervously about seeing real patients, presenting histories and physicals in the inpatient and outpatient setting. Many of us noted with some trepidation that we don’t do any pediatric exams during our first two years of medical school. While I still believe that many of my colleagues were much more prepared than they believed themselves to be, orientation was nonetheless an important reminder that no matter how large or small the ...

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  • One small step for a current student, one giant leap for me

    Andrea Knittel
    AMSA Member
    6th Year MSTP
    University of Michigan

    Post #7 of the "Back to the Wards" series focusing on the transition from research years back to the medical school and clinical rotations.

    On Monday and Tuesday of this week, an incredibly gracious current M3 let me shadow him on the first two days of his inpatient pediatrics rotation. I would highly recommend this before returning from an extended absence, as it not only gives you a better sense of what will happen in the months to come, but gives the more advanced student a unique opportunity to demonstrate everything he/she has learned and to teach a newer student.

    The logistics: The MD/PhD program identified a willing volunteer who was on an inpatient pediatrics rotation this month, which is what I’ll be doing in either May or June, and put me in touch with him. I decided not to go to orientation, as I knew I’d get my own orientation soon enough, but met up with him following orientation before rounds started for the day. I only spent a few hours with the team on Monday, but I got a good sense of how the team works in the hospital, and when I showed up for pre-rounding on Tuesday, I got a real sense ...

    Full story

    Comments (0)

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. Next page

What is AMSA On Call?

AMSA On Call is the official blog of the American Medical Student Association. Join us as we discuss the hottest issues in health care. 

Join Us This Fall!

AMSA Training Grounds

This fall, in Chicago and Chapel Hill, future physicians from around the world will come together for inspiration, camaraderie, knowledge, networking and fun—you have to be there! Register today.

Follow Us

Follow us on FaceBook Follow us on Twitter AMSA on YouTube AMSA RSS


Save the Date

AMSA's 2015 Annual Convention
AMSA's 2015 Annual Convention

February 26 - March 1, 2015
Arlington, VA / Washington, DC

Current Campaigns

AMSA actively focuses on campaigns throughout the year that align with our organization's aspirations, mission and values.

The New Physician (TNP)

The New Physician MagazineRead AMSA's award-winning magazine & past issues.